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May/June 2013

Can Global Brands Create Just Supply Chains?

Richard M. Locke leads a forum on corporate responsibility for factory workers, with responses from Isaac Shapiro, Layna Mosley, and others; Lili Loofbourow on privatized education in Chile; Peter Godfrey-Smith on what it’s like to be an octopus; and more.

 

Forum 

Can Global Brands Create Just Supply Chains?

Richard M. Locke — with responses from

ISAAC SHAPIRO, TIM BARTLEY, JODI L. SHORT AND MICHAEL W. TOFFEL, GARY GEREFFI, HANNAH JONES, PAMELA PASSMAN, DRUSILLA BROWN, ASEEM PRAKASH, AND LAYNA MOSLEY.


Editors’ Note
Deborah Chasman and Joshua Cohen

Foundations

State of the Nation: A Costly Defense
Cindy Williams
Exhuming Neruda
Stephen Phelan
Getting Smarter
Claude S. Fischer
Founding Firearms
Pamela S. Karlan

Context

“No to Profit”:Fighting Privatization in Chile
Lili Loofbourow

Private Life

Picking Pebbles: The Morality of Choice
Deborah Stone

Books & Ideas

On Being an Octopus: >Diving Deep in Search of the Human Mind
Peter Godfrey-Smith
Unacceptable: Recovering Paul Goodman
Judith Levine
Little, Big: Two Ideas About Fighting Global Poverty
Pranab Bardhan

Fiction

The Forgetting Shiraz
E. Lily Yu

On Film

Lolita in Japan: Abbas Kiarostami’s Like Someone in Love
Alan A. Stone

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