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octnov04
October/November 2004

Sadik J. Al-Azm discusses Western dominance and the Muslim world; Alex de Waal explains the tragedy in Darfur; Ahmed S. Hashim on the Iraqi insurgency; a manifesto for democracy in Taiwan.

Scott Saul looks at Henry Dumas, the lost voice of the Black Arts Movement; poetry from Allen Grossman and others.

 

Forum 

In Empire’s Shadow
Time Out of Joint

WESTERN DOMINANCE, ISLAMIST TERROR, AND THE ARAB IMAGINATION
SADIK J. AL-AZM

Tragedy in Darfur

ON UNDERSTANDING AND ENDING THE HORROR
ALEX DE WAAL

Iraq’s Chaos

WHY THE INSURGENCY WON’T GO AWAY
AHMED S. HASHIM

Manifesto

AN ARGUMENT FOR DEMOCRACY IN TAIWAN
THE EDITORS OF TAIWAN; TRANSLATED BY THEODORE HUTERS


Essays

Cruel and Unusual
The end of the Eighth Amendment
Joan Dayan
Necessary Truths
Scott Soames’s Philosophical Analysis in the Twentieth Century
Alex Byrne and Ned Hall
High Art in Low Times
David Caute’s The Dancer Defects and Frances Stonor Saunders’s The Cultural Cold War
Catherine Gunther Kodat
The Happy Place
Walt Kelly’s Pogo
John Crowley
The Devil and Henry Dumas
A lost voice of the Black Arts Movement
Scott Saul
American Legacy
On writing The Vagabonds
Nicholas Delbanco

Fiction

The Red Clock
Maile Chapman

On Film

Lawless
Pedro Almodóvar’s Bad Education
Alan A. Stone

On Poetry

Not Your Father’s Formalism
Marilyn Hacker’s Desesperanto, Mimi Khalvati’s The Chine, and Rosanna Warren’s Departure
Rafael Campo
Streaming Poetry
Tan Lin’s BlipSoak01
Brian Kim Stefans
Harder to See
Craig Dworkin’s Reading the Illegible
Jacques Khalip
Microreviews

Poems

Poet’s Sampler
Introduced by Dara Weir
Molly Dorozenski
Poetry-Contest Winner
Introduced by Cole Swensen
Michael Tod Edgerton
Port Sunlight
Allen Grossman
The Last Modernist
Susan M. Schultz
The Untraumatized Man
Susan M. Schultz
Shipfitters
Allen Grossman
The Revenge of the Bathwater (Earl Version)
Bob Perelman
Prologue
Rusty Morrison

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