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Mary Kathryn Nagle Emma Lower

The reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act is an important step, but activist Mary Kathryn Nagle argues that only full restoration of Indigenous sovereignty will stop the epidemic.

Randall L. Kennedy

King could not accomplish what philosophers and theologians also failed to—distinguishing moral from immoral law in a polarized society.

Judith Levine

“Don’t Say Gay” laws can be traced to the Reagan-era crusade to put “parents’ rights” before the interests of children.

Dorothy Roberts Nia T. Evans

The system’s roots aren’t in rescuing children, but in the policing of Black, Indigenous, and poor families.

Sandeep Vaheesan

Corporate restructurings are not a cure-all, but they would tilt the balance of power toward ordinary Americans.

Joseph J. Fischel

The Supreme Court recognizes the right of consenting adults to an erotic life free of state control. Given that, it shouldn’t matter whether sex is your job.

Baher Azmy

The lawless—and ongoing—administration of the prison by four American presidents underwrites the broader democratic crisis we face today.

Chad Kautzer

The militarization of gun culture among both civilians and police reflects an increasingly energetic defense of white rule in the United States. This has been facilitated in part by an NRA-led reinterpretation of what the Second Amendment meant by “militia”.

Christine Henneberg

My patients and I don’t use words like “choice” or “viability.”

Derecka Purnell Nia T. Evans

Derecka Purnell discusses her new book Becoming Abolitionists, how she came to join the movement against policing and prisons, and what a just world looks like.

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Professor of Law and Government at Cornell University. Margulies was Counsel of Record in Rasul v. Bush (2004), involving detentions at the Guantánamo Bay Naval Station.