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November/December 2011

Citizen Consumer

Dana O’Rourke leads a forum on the promise of ethical consumption, with responses from Scott Nova, Juliet B. Schor, Margaret Levi, Richard M. Locke, and more. Tom Barry discusses Rick Perry’s impact on states’ rights; Alfred F. Young on the real tea party; Egypt’s culture of street protest; maced at Occupy Wall Street

 

Forum 

Citizen Consumer

Dara O’Rourke — with responses from:

SCOTT NOVA; JULIET B. SCHOR; LISA ANN RICHEY AND STEFANO PONTE; SCOTT E. HARTLEY; MARGARET LEVI; AURET VAN HEERDEN; ANDREW SZASZ; AND RICHARD M. LOCKE.


Editors’ Note
Deborah Chasman and Joshua Cohen

Foundations

State of the Nation: A World Apart
Ryan D. Enos
Dispatch: Return to Haiti
Colin Dayan
Dispatch: Why I Was Maced at Occupy Wall Street
Jeanne Mansfield
Karlan’s Court: The Cost of Death
Pamela S. Karlan

Context

The People and the Patriots: Who Led Whom in the American Revolution?
Alfred F. Young
Politics by Other Means: In Egypt, Street Protests Set the Agenda
Mona El-Ghobashy

Books & Ideas

The Return of States’ Rights; Why Rick Perry Is Important Even if He Loses
Tom Barry
Unpacking: Ben Katchor’s The Cardboard Valise
John Crowley

Fiction

Mutts
David Riordan

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