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Robin D. G. Kelley Deborah Chasman

Robin D. G. Kelley on the midterm elections.

Lynne Segal

Remembrances of the late author have focused on her best-selling Nickel and Dimed with only rare acknowledgement of the major roles she played in women’s liberation and U.S. socialism.

What if “post-growth living” could be an opportunity for greater pleasure, not less?

Charisse Burden-Stelly Jodi Dean

Decades ago, Black communist women decided to organize, fight, and win.

Martijn Konings

The Federal Reserve’s bid to “get wages down” reflects the enduring hold of neoliberal thought at the highest levels of economic policymaking.

Jonathan Kirshner

In his new book, the former Fed chair cuts through economic orthodoxy on central banking. But he fails to reckon deeply with its political consequences.

Sheryl Sandberg standing in front a big board showing Facebook's network of social connections
Matthew Crain

Twenty-five years of neoliberal political economy are to blame for today’s regime of surveillance advertising, and only public policy can undo it.

Portrait of historian Robin D.G. Kelley
Robin D. G. Kelley

Robin D. G. Kelley published his pathbreaking history of the Black radical imagination in 2002. Where are we two decades later?

Jamie Martin

To escape the imperial legacies of the IMF and World Bank, we need a radical new vision for global economic governance.

Mie Inouye

How a new class of “salts”—radicals who take jobs to help unionization—is boosting the organizing efforts of long-term workers.

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