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Summer 1999

The New Politics of Consumption

A forum on Juliet Schor’s “The New Politics of Consumption,” with responses by Robert H. Frank, Betsy Taylor, James B. Twitchell and others. Diego Gambetta on the Primo Levi’s tragic death. G. M. Tamás on the roots of the Kosovo conflict. Poetry by Jordan Davis, Emma Straub and Jesper Svenbro, and more.

 

Forum 

The New Politics of Consumption 
WHY DO AMERICANS WANT SO MUCH MORE THAN THEY NEED?
JULIET SCHOR
RESPONSES FROM ROBERT H. FRANK, JAMES TWITCHELL, JACK GIBBONS, CLAIR BROWN, BETSY TAYLOR, DOUGLAS B. HOLT, CRAIG J. THOMPSON, MICHELE LAMONT AND VIRAG MOLNAR, AND LAWRENCE MISHEL, JARED BERNSTEIN AND JOHN SCHMITT. JULIET SCHOR REPLIES.

Essays

Twelve years on, a new look at the Italian author’s death
Diego Gambetta
Searching for the origins of the Kosovo conflict—in the eighteenth century
G. M. Tamás
Forced deportations are turning the Ethiopian-Eritrean border conflict into ethnic war
Noah Benjamin Novogrodsky
From post-literary America, ringing praise for Ernest Hemingway
Neil Shister
Fiction
Pamela Erens
Poetry
Introduced by David Shapiro
Jamey Dunham
Karri Harrison
Emma Straub
Steven Monte
Elizabeth Macklin
Elizabeth Macklin
Jesper Svenbro
Jesper Svenbro
On Film
Eric Rohmer’s The Autumn Tale
Alan A. Stone

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