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Thinking in a Pandemic

We’ve brought together all our COVID-19 coverage in one place. Here you’ll find the latest arguments from doctors and epidemiologists, philosophers and economists, legal scholars and historians, activists and citizens, as they think not just through this moment but beyond it.

Katharine S. Walter

Until COVID-19, tuberculosis killed more people each year than any other infectious disease. Its rising toll is increasingly fueled by mass incarceration.

Adam Gaffney

To meet the challenge of enduring spread in the years to come, we must prioritize primary care and community health over the profit-driven status quo.

Sheila Jasanoff

The United States ranked first on health security; then came COVID-19. In place of technocratic hubris, we need robust new forms of democratic humility.

Wendy Johnson

Physicians have been fighting for health justice for decades. To succeed, we need practical models for collectively remaking our systems of care.

Kyle Harper

Our mastery over microbes is only a few decades old. It is also far more precarious than we imagine.

Andrew L. Croxford

Concerns about long-term side effects have helped fuel vaccine hesitancy. An immunologist explains why we can be confident in vaccine safety.

Max Jordan Nguemeni Tiako

If we want to address vaccine hesitancy in the health care system, we must treat its lowest paid workers better.

Gregory E. Kaebnick

Its authority derives not from unbiased scientists but from the institutions and norms that structure their work. Fighting mistrust requires more public engagement with policy, not unqualified deference to experts.

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William Callison Quinn Slobodian

Defying conventional political labels and capitalizing on widespread distrust, a range of new movements share the conviction that all power is conspiracy.

Michael McColly Care COVID HIV AIDS
Michael McColly

Indifference toward the most vulnerable has driven the death toll of COVID-19, just as it did during the height of the HIV/AIDS crisis. Against this backdrop, even small acts of kindness can make a difference.

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…we need your help. Confronting the many challenges of COVID-19—from the medical to the economic, the social to the political—demands all the moral and deliberative clarity we can muster. In Thinking in a Pandemic, we’ve organized the latest arguments from doctors and epidemiologists, philosophers and economists, legal scholars and historians, activists and citizens, as they think not just through this moment but beyond it. While much remains uncertain, Boston Review’s responsibility to public reason is sure. That’s why you’ll never see a paywall or ads. It also means that we rely on you, our readers, for support. If you like what you read here, pledge your contribution to keep it free for everyone by making a tax-deductible donation.

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